Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Fabric Numbers

I made these soft numbers out of fabric for James to use during school time. Note, they're bigger than they look in the photo - they're about 6-7 inches long. They're meant to be quilted, but since I don't own a sewing machine I wasn't able to do that. They have soft batting inside of them and the frayed edges give them that 'rag' look. I love them! I was inspired to make these when The Activity Mom blogged about them here. I'd LOVE to have a fabric alphabet set, too, but the thought of hand stitching 26 letters makes me cringe!

Linking up to Creative Friday.

~Thank you for your comments!~

23 comments:

The Activity Mom said...

Those are SO cute!!!!!!I can't believe that you did those by hand. Wow!

Lindsay said...

oohhh my word! Love them! I bet James will too!

Michelle said...

Oh, I love, love these! So bright and colorful ~ beautiful hand stitches too!

Eva said...

OO I've had these on my list too, love the way they turned out, looks great :)

Andrea said...

I made Alphabet rag quilt ones that you can see here: http://jadaroo.blogspot.com/2010/03/rag-letters.html
I love the numbers will have to try to make some soon:)
p.s. I can't wait to see how you organized your teaching materials:)

Beth- the mama bee said...

I've had these on my list after seeing them at happy together (which I see is where Activity mom linked back too also (funny). I am curious... is that the 4 and 1 that you teach James... or do you try to show all styles of 'handwriting'? I always make sure that our letters and numbers are plain clear font, but Bee still gets confused when she sees a "g" (you know with the fancy tail) Lou is confused by "a" with the tops, etc. It makes me wonder if I should be more conscious about showing them various styles of letter.

Counting Coconuts said...

Thank you for your comments!

Beth, to be honest I just printed out the tutorial's template and didn't think twice about the style of the numbers! :) James has never had an issue recognizing various styles of numbers, but I've seen the fancy 'a' (like the one I just wrote) and the q's with the additional circle at the bottom, throw him for a loop.

Unfortunately for James I have a bad habit of writing my numbers in a German font (where the 1 looks like a sloppy 7 and the 7 looks like a 't'). I try to catch myself, but I've been doing it for so long that it's just habit now. I chalk it up to my years of studying the German language. :)

Mari-Ann

F├Ârskoleburken said...

Beatiful and inspiring. As always! Impressad, as always!

Elle Belles Bows said...

LOVE it. I do not have a sewing machine either. So, I would be in the same boat on the alphabet! However, "grammy" has one. Maybe I can talk her into making them:-) Thanks for sharing! Kerri

mindy2780 said...

These are great. I plan to homeschool my son next year for preschool and I plan to make a set of these myself. Thanks for the idea!

Kama said...

My best friend, Sandra, is selling quilted letters to raise money for an adoption. Here is her post about it: http://peoplesonline.blogspot.com/2010/06/quilted-letters.html The auction is obviously closed, but you can e-mail her and she can send you the information. I forget what she charges, but it wasn't much!

sue said...

These are lovely! I wanted to add my two cents here with the different types of ways that one can produce the number 4, number 7 (with or without the little tag), letter a, letter q, letter g, etc.

For teaching children without disabilities it is important to use different types of fonts. Most typical learners are able to generalize (learning the a is the same showed both ways).

For children that learn differently, (specifically my son who has severe autism), you may have to teach using different types of fonts. E.g. This is a little a and this is a little "a-the version without the little hat on top). Both are the same. Some may have to be taught sorting all the a's (different font types, different sizes of a's, different colors of a's, etc).

It all depends upon the specific learning to the child.

To add my two cents now, all of you moms are fantastic. I have a basement full of what I call "labor of love" educative items. Having three boys that were taught from the age of two who needed intensive home programs (40-60 hours per week) and one of my sons who is almost 17 still being taught at the 24 mo to preK level - you are the moms who inspire me to keep going...

Thank you all. Your hard work today will pay off in endless ways. These beautiful handmade numbers will be passed on for generations throughout your family.

If I could afford to buy all of you sets of letters - I would. I read your posts and your comments and I keep on teaching my son - the same things with new twists and different themes b/c of you. He loses information when he seizes during the night. I think he knows that this information was once understood - so to me it is a matter of his dignity to reteach it to him in a different way.

My most humble thanks to you all.
Thank you Mari-Ann for your blog!

Jill Stanish said...

Your numbers are gorgeous! And such a great way to use up fabric scraps. For an alphabet, could you do a no sew option and make them of felt and then either fuse the edges or hot glue them? You could always later stick as you have time but your child would have the use of them in the meantime.

Counting Coconuts said...

@Kama & Jill: Great ideas, ladies - thank you!

@Sue: Thank you so very much, Sue, for your kind and helpful comment! You had me moved to tears - you are an inspiration you are to ME what with all you do for your sons. *hugs*

maria said...

What a great idea! This is something that can be used with children with disabilities also...excellent idea!

The hand stitches gives it the right touch :-)

Blessings,

M.

Love and Lollipops said...

These are wonderful!

heart4home said...

Maybe you can make the letters with craft foam; it would be easier than quilting!

Leslie
nomoreworksheets.com

Brandi said...

Why would you have to hand stitch them? Why not just use your sewing machine...or maybe you don't have one? Mighta just answered my own question there! LOL

Tombul Peri - S─▒la said...

Hi There :)
I live in Turkey, Istanbul and found your blog by accident. Loved it and got immediately a follower. I am still working full time therefore love to find out how to play with my child much more happily and quality wise. Thanks so much for the tips :) Will start ASAP with the numbers :)
Love Sila

Shannon said...

Cool! Love your site! How do you stop them from fraying?

Counting Coconuts said...

@Shannon: surprisingly, they haven't frayed much at all. I did try a bit of fray-check on one of the numbers, but I didn't like the smell or feel of it.

SuzyQSparkles said...

LOVE your blog!!! So many ideas I am finding here thanks to a pin from Pintrest on your Circle Time Calendar.

Have you thought of using fabric that doesn't fray for the alphabet? Minkie/Plush/Microsuede/Felt

What about using something like Corduroy/Denim and putting a bit of glue (fray check type) on the edges.

Lovingmama said...

Love these! We made a similar set to put in a felt food bakery basket for a toddler gift and I linked back to your tutorial on my post. http://theeducatorsspinonit.blogspot.com/2011/12/diy-handmade-gifts-for-toddlers-are-as.html

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